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 Q: Who is Greyhound Rescue of Vermont?

 Q:
Tell me about the Greyhounds?

 Q:
What is the adoption fee?

 Q:
How will a Greyhound get along with my children?

 Q:
Are there any special health problems I should know about?

 Q:
What is a Greyhound's life expectancy?

 Q:
What about my other pets?

 Q:
What about exercise? Do I have to take up running?

 Q:
Are they housebroken?

 Q:
I'm ready to adopt! What do I do now?

 Q:
I can't adopt a dog right now, but I'd like to help them!
 

 
  Copyright 2004Greyhound Rescue of Vermont

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q: Who is Greyhound Rescue of Vermont

A: Greyhound Rescue of Vermont (GRV) is a non-profit organization dedicated to finding homes for former greyhound racers.  Over the past ten+ years, GRV has placed over 1,000 dogs in Vermont, New York and Canada.  Our organization is run entirely by volunteers and supported solely by donations.
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Q: Tell me about the Greyhounds?

A: The greyhounds come to us directly from the racetrack, usually at about 2-5 years of age.  They stand between 26 and 29 inches tall at their shoulder and weigh from 50 to 80 pounds.  They come in a variety of colors:  black, red, blue (grey), brindle (striped), or any of these with white (parti).

The majority of greyhounds are gentle good-natured dogs who adapt well to home life and enjoy human companionship.  Contrary to popular opinion, greyhounds are not "hyper" and do not need to run constantly, nor do they need an exceptionally large amount of living space.  Inside the home, they have been described as "40 mph couch potatoes" and are very happy to curl up on a soft blanket or dog bed.

Greyhounds are particularly suited to life in town where opportunities for leash-walking abound, but also do well as country pets, provided the following important precautions are observed:  "Greyhounds are "sight-hounds" and therefore are attracted to moving objects.  To keep your dog safe, he/she must never be allowed to roam free.  When outside, greyhounds must either be kept on a leash or in a fenced-in area and should never be tied out."
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Q: What is the adoption fee ?

A: The dog you adopt from GRV has received a veterinary exam, heartworm test, routine worming, all shots and has been spayed or neutered. We also include a health certificate, ID tag and a new collar. For this we charge an adoption fee of $225. We follow up on all adoptions to help you and your new pet make a smooth transition. Don't hesitate to call for advice and/or to ask questions. We will be happy to help in any way we can.
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Q: How will a Greyhound get along with my children ?

A: Greyhounds make good family pets. Being mature dogs, they are not as playful as puppies, but are generally very tolerant of and affectionate with children. (As with any dog, greyhounds have their limits, and children should be taught not to abuse them or play too roughly.)
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Q: Are there any special health problems I should know about?

A: Some greyhounds have bad teeth due to the soft diet they received at the track. Like other dogs, they can eventually suffer from chronic diseases such as cancer, arthritis and other common canine ailments. Unlike some other breeds, however, they are not prone to hip dysplasia.
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Q: What is a Greyhound's life expectancy?

A: Greyhounds generally live to be approximately 12 years old.
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Q: What about my other pets?

A: Having been raised with other dogs, greyhounds are usually comfortable in a multi-dog household. Many can also learn to live in harmony with cats and other small animals (we "cat check" all our dogs before placing them), but as with any new dog, they should be carefully monitored at first.
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Q: What about exercise?  Do I have to take up running?

A : A greyhound needs no more exercise than the average dog. If you do not have a fenced-in yard, your greyhound should be taken out 4 times a day on a leash to relieve itself. These dogs are great walking companions and do not have to be run to get adequate exercise. But if you have access to a large fenced-in area, your pet will enjoy the occasional opportunity to really fly.
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Q: Are they housebroken?

A: Greyhounds are accustomed to keeping their kennels clean, and most make the transition to staying clean in the house easily. They live according to a set routine at the track, with specific times for going outside. You can use this to your advantage by taking your dog out on a schedule.
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Q: I'm ready to adopt! What do I do now?

A: Dogs are shown by appointment or visit us at a Meet and Greet. To schedule a visit, or for more information, please contact:
SANDY FARRELL @ 482-2673
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Q: I can't adopt a dog right now, but I'd like to help them!

A: Great! We are always looking for volunteers to provide foster homes and to walk dogs. Other areas of need include public relations and fund raising. Please call to find out how your interests might suit our needs. We always need and greatly appreciate donations of either money or materials as we are a non-profit organization and rely on these in order to operate. 

Supplies that we continually need are noted below: We will be more than happy to pick up your donations.
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