Gastineau Humane Society

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A Brief History of the Gastineau Humane Society

The Gastineau Humane Society (GHS) first opened its door in 1963. Staffed by volunteers, the original shelter was located under the Juneau-Douglas Bridge in a small space donated by the city and stocked with air kennels. As Juneau grew, so did the number of unwanted pets. By the mid 1970's, the original space was inadequate to handle the number of animals it was receiving. A local couple, concerned with the cramped conditions in the make shift building, donated land and volunteers set to work raising money to build a more permanent shelter. Climate and substandard building materials took their toll on the first shelter. Volunteers came to the rescue again and raised money to build the existing shelter in the mid 1980's. The shelter has 45 dog runs, two cat rooms (rooms designed specifically to hold cats in a common area so they do not have to be kenneled), two cat meet and greet rooms (where you can get to know an individual cat) and one dog meet and greet room (where you can spend time with one of the dogs). Additionally, we have quarantine areas for animals who have recently arrived and have not had a medical check up, an isolation ward for sick animals, medical kennels for animals who are recovering from surgery or serious injury and a clinic that cares for all GHS animals.

Animals from all over Southeast Alaska have received a second chance at life at the Gastineau Humane Society. The professional staff and dedicated volunteers provide care and love to animals 365 days a year.

Table of Contents

  1. What is the mission of the Gastineau Humane Society?
  2. How do you accomplish your mission?
  3. Is GHS a City and Borough (CBJ) agency?
  4. How is GHS funded?
  5. What is the relationship between GHS and Animal Control?
  6. What is the benefit of having animal control run through the humane society?
  7. What is your euthanasia policy?
  8. Does the clinic provide veterinary services to the public?
  9. What services does GHS provide to the public?
  10. What is the GHS policy on spaying and neutering?
  11. How can the general public assist GHS with spaying and neutering?
  12. What other special designated funds does GHS have?
  13. How can people help?

What is the mission of the Gastineau Humane Society?

Our mission is to: Eliminate cruelty and suffering to domestic and companion animals by promoting kindness and compassion through education and training.

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How do you accomplish your mission?

Education is the key to successfully accomplishing our mission. The shelter has a large number of one-on-one programs, training and information videos, printed material and professional resources to provide to any member of the public who wants or needs assistance.

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Is GHS a City and Borough (CBJ) agency?

No.  GHS is a private 501 (c) 3 non profit corporation. We are independent of and from any government agency.
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How is GHS funded?

GHS is funded by membership dues, private donations, grants, sale of pet related items, boarding, grooming and independent contracts for specific services such as animal control and dog training.
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What is the relationship between GHS and Animal Control?

Animal control is a section of GHS.  CBJ contracts with GHS to provide animal control services.  The contract outlines  the duties and responsibilities of GHS to the municipality. Animal control officers and the staff that supports animal control are employees of GHS and are not attached to CBJ in any manner.

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What is the benefit of having animal control run through the humane society?

The benefit to CBJ (and Juneau tax payers) is tremendous. The primary benefit to CBJ is financial. CBJ (and therefore Juneau citizens and tax payers) save on personnel costs such as salaries, insurance and benefits (for staff who have to be available 24 hours a day 365 days a week); workman’s comp; facility costs and insurance; staffing numbers; and facility operating expenses. The most important benefit is the one the animals receive. In every way their lives are made better because they receive the same care, love and attention that shelter animals receive and  (unlike municipal shelters)  when their  “time is up” they are not euthanized.  They simply make a move from being a stray to being up for adoption ~ a choice the humane society pays for and the animals appreciate!
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What is your euthanasia policy?

GHS does not euthanize any animal unless they have failed a temperament test or have a serious illness or condition  that diminishes the quality of their life or affects the lives of other sheltered animals.
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Does the clinic provide veterinary services to the public?

No. The GHS clinic, which opened in October of 2005, is for GHS-owned animals only.
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What services does GHS provide to the public?

GHS provides the following low cost services:

Contact us for more information

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What is the GHS policy on spaying and neutering?

GHS believes that the most effective way to reduce the population of unwanted pets is to have an active spay and neuter program. Over the past three years GHS has provided over $42,000.00 to the public in spay and neuter assistance. This is money that GHS has raised.

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How can the general public assist GHS with spaying and neutering?

Most importantly is to spay and neuter your own pets. Secondly we have a designated fund (meaning the money will be spent on spaying and neutering only) that people can donate to. This fund helps individuals who would like to spay and neuter their pet but cannot afford to do so.
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What other special designated funds does GHS have?

We have a Second Chance Fund designed to help animals who need surgery or other veterinary care in order to have a good quality of life.  The spay/neuter fund (mentioned above) and  the Pet Behavior Hot Line fund to help GHS provide free services to individuals who would like help with their pets behavior problems.

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How can people help?

ü      By adopting an animal from the shelter.  All shelter animals have all of their vaccinations, are spayed or neutered, micro chipped and licensed.

ü      By becoming a member.  Members help keep the organization healthy and vibrant and the dues they provide goes into programs that benefit all of the animals at the shelter.

ü      By providing an item on our wish list of supplies ranging from sponges to dog food that are easily obtainable in most grocery stores.

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Please Help!
Your contribution will make a difference.

7705 Glacier Highway * Juneau, Alaska 99801 * (907) 789-0260 * FAX (907) 789-1795
 Kennel Hours: Monday-Friday 3 p.m.  - 6 p.m., Saturday 2 p.m.  - 5 p.m.
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 9:30 a.m.  - 6 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.  - Closed Sunday

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Updated Thursday, March 30, 2006 05:11:58 PM